TV and Documentaries in the Cloud – Making the Switch to a Chromebook

TV and Documentaries in the Cloud – Making the Switch to a Chromebook

Since I started writing the Making the switch to a Chromebook series, only two articles ago, I rolled from one amazing moment into the next. It’s really great to get introduced to this whole world of wonders the internet turns out to be. And yes, that did grow completely separate from the Chromebook and is also there for the avid IE user, for example. But, it does come to it’s complete fruition, it seems, when using a cloud computing device.

In this post I want to share with you what I’ve learned so far. What I’ll be talking about is just a selection of what I ran into, and liked, when testing out the wole watching stuff online thing. I do want to encourage you to go onto the Google and do some searching yourself though, there’s really a lot out there.

Just as in choosing a suitable replacement for my local music player with a cloud version, I drew up a simple wishlist. This time in advance. However, I did chuck that list eventually for the simple reason that my questions brought to light that I was hopelessly outdated and that they didn’t really apply.

What happend?

I thought in terms of channels, broadcasters and shows. Completely legitimate when living in the past trying to survive your uneventful Saturday evening. Useless however in an online-only world where the question turns out to be more about what interests you. Because that’s what it’s all about, you. What you want to see, learn, enjoy or be moved by. Knowing what you like all you have to do is look for someone or some network that serves up what interests you. There are already some what is called special interest video networks that cater to specific interests, or niches. Comparatively small yet often high quality outfits that are build around specific fields of interest.

Special Interest Networks

Examples of these special interest video networks’ you might already know are the TWiT network (here the app) and Rivision3 (and their app). Another great example of a special interest channel is the online academy of a young mathematician called Khan, the Khan Academy. It’s a not-for-profit with the goal of changing education for the better by providing a free world-class education to anyone anywhere. All of the site’s resources are available to anyone. They’ve got a huge number of video’s explaining everything from solving and graphing linear equations to quadratics and everything in between. Check out the example below, it’s actually fun!

And let’s not forget Youtube. I admit that it does mostly seem to be a flood of nonsense, but there is also a lot of serious content. Take the Ted Talks or Brian Dunning channels for example. All great stuff.

Also deserving of more than just a link is Vimeo. It is as Vimeo describes itself a respectful community of creative people who are passionate about sharing the videos they make. Going to the site you can tell that’s a accurate description, it shows. With many thousands of special interest channels and very high quality content it is a delight to go to. Let me just show you one example of what great work you can watch there. This one I ran into in the ‘activism & non profits’ channel under Socially Minded Documentaries: “Coping With Drought” (2011) – KENYA from Tom Whitworth.

Here are more, great places to go visit:

  • Crowd Tube, an addictive stream of viral Youtube videos.
  • Hulu, movies & TV episodes
  • Netflix, movies & TV episodes
  • Amazon Instant Video, great selection of new TV series and Movies.
  • Redux, a new kind of TV—hundreds of channels of entertaining, hand-picked video, all from a passionate community of curators.
  • Daily Motion, music videos, short movies, tv shows, funny and extreme videos.
  • HBO GO, every episode of every season of the best HBO shows, movies, comedy, sports, and documentaries. Note: HBO Go still requires a cable subscription. HBO will NOT allow you to stream video unless you’re paying for cable already. Thank you Jesse for pointing that out!

 

My conclusion to date in Making the Switch

With music, film and video out of the way I think we’re off on a stellar start attempting to mimic the online life on the Chromebook. When I look at how much progress I’ve made after this short period of searching and learning and taking advantage of everything the web has to offer, I’m certainly not unhappy. OK I admit, listening to music or watching streaming movies and videos isn’t just reserved for those of us using the Chrome browser. This is the Web, anyone with half a browser can do his. But it does make a Chromebook an interesting choice.

I’d love to hear what your experiences are. Let me know in the comments.

Have fun Chroming and until next time!

4 Comments

  1. Productivity Tools – Making the Switch to a Chromebook « « ChromebookHQ ChromebookHQ
    Apr 17, 2012 @ 07:22:00

    [...] found amazing ways to enjoy music anywhere and everywhere and learned about great, high quality documentaries that moved me to my core. It’s a great ride so far, adding to the promise of a [...]

    Reply

  2. Josh
    Sep 03, 2012 @ 02:43:28

    hole should be spelled whole

    Reply

  3. Josh
    Sep 03, 2012 @ 02:45:43

    Also I am trying to use hbogo.com as you suggested which i am logged into and pay for and nothing happens after the ratings are shown… it just buffers indefinitely. Are you positive it works on Chromebooks?

    Reply

  4. Kain Young
    Sep 03, 2012 @ 04:46:14

    Hi Josh, thanks for getting back to me. Did you get it working on your end?

    Reply

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